when nature offers us to see what is most intriguing

This is one of the priority objectives of this competition, as explained by Jean-Yves Kernel, director of Éditions Biotope, which publishes a magnificent book every year in which we find all the winning shots, accompanied by precise texts, pedagogical, and elements of contextualization (1): “Through their work, these artists reveal to us what is most beautiful and intriguing in nature, but also how fragile it is in the face of the ever-pressing onslaught of a human population . Their photographs help us to become aware of the scope of our daily actions. »


First price. In the middle of this humming ball of bees, a single female that the males seek to conquer. This shot earned Karine Aigner the nature photographer of the year 2022.

Karine Aigner/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

The end of a gorilla

The American Karine Aigner wins the First Prize, for an image entitled “The big buzz”, a whirring ball of bees swaying on the hot sand of a ranch in Texas. All but one are males who have every intention of mating with the single female in the center of the cluster.

Another outstanding prize, that of “nature photojournalism”, awarded to the South African Brent Stirton. His moving photo shows a mountain gorilla living his last moments in the arms of his caretaker, guard André Bauma. It was he who had recovered the animal, then a baby, the only survivor of a group of gorillas whose seven members were delivered from being executed on the orders of a coal mafia. For thirteen years, André Bauma cared for Ndakasi in the world’s only orphanage for mountain gorillas, located in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Ndakasi lives his last moments, victim of an unknown viral infection, in the arms of his caretaker, guard André Bauma, at the Senkwekwe Center, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (prize for nature photojournalism).


Ndakasi lives his last moments, victim of an unknown viral infection, in the arms of his caretaker, guard André Bauma, at the Senkwekwe Center, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (prize for nature photojournalism).

Brent Stirton / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

Special mention also to Daniel Núñez for his prize “Wetlands: looking further”. “The Agony of the Lake” fixes in an aerial view the layers of cyanobacteria that cover and attack Lake Amatitlàn, in Guatemala.

other prizes

A spectacled bear, a species in decline, stands out against the anthropized landscape of the Andes, near Quito, Ecuador.  Instead of páramos and cloud forests – the original ecosystems of this region, which provide abundant food for this bear which is essentially vegetarian – the landscape shows deforested hills, agricultural terraces and urban sprawl on the industrial periphery. of the capital.  (Prize Animals in their environment).


A spectacled bear, a species in decline, stands out against the anthropized landscape of the Andes, near Quito, Ecuador. Instead of páramos and cloud forests – the original ecosystems of this region, which provide abundant food for this bear which is essentially vegetarian – the landscape shows deforested hills, agricultural terraces and urban sprawl on the industrial periphery. of the capital. (Prize Animals in their environment).

Daniel Mideros / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

Chilean flamingos line up on a perfectly calm lake in the Andes.  Known as the


Chilean flamingos line up on a perfectly calm lake in the Andes. Known as the “mirror of the sky”, these otherworldly salt flats, located near Uyuni in southwestern Bolivia, cover more than 10,000 km². It is the largest salt flat in the world (Art de la nature prize).

Junji Takasago / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

A Yucatán rat snake begins to swallow a bat it caught mid-air in total darkness as it hangs from the ceiling of the 'snake cave' in Kantemó, Mexico.  Rat snakes are not venomous but they kill their prey (small rodents, birds, frogs and lizards) by constriction, swallowing the animal whole, head first so that the limbs respond more easily (Amphibious Behavior award and reptiles).


A Yucatán rat snake begins to swallow a bat it caught mid-air in total darkness as it hangs from the ceiling of the ‘snake cave’ in Kantemó, Mexico. Rat snakes are not venomous but they kill their prey (small rodents, birds, frogs and lizards) by constriction, swallowing the animal whole, head first so that the limbs respond more easily (Amphibious Behavior award and reptiles).

Fernando Constantino Martínez Belmar / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

A male Houbara bustard strikes a pose, all feathers ruffled, after a frenetic performance across the plains of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, in the hope of attracting a mate.  His reckless appearance belies his very fearful nature.  There are probably less than 750 left on the island (Animal Portrait award).


A male Houbara bustard strikes a pose, all feathers ruffled, after a frenetic performance across the plains of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands, in the hope of attracting a mate. His reckless appearance belies his very fearful nature. There are probably less than 750 left on the island (Animal Portrait award).

José Juan Hernández Martinez / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

Electrifying!  Semen drips from the arms of a starfish as the five-limbed animal slowly rises and sways like a towering alien, slicing through lightning in the waters of Kinko Bay at the far south of the island of Kyushu, Japan.  This nuptial posture, seen in some species of starfish, can help release eggs or sperm, or simply disseminate gametes in currents (Aquatic World award)


Electrifying! Semen drips from the arms of a starfish as the five-limbed animal slowly rises and sways like a towering alien, slicing through lightning in the waters of Kinko Bay at the far south of the island of Kyushu, Japan. This nuptial posture, seen in some species of starfish, can help release eggs or sperm, or simply disseminate gametes in currents (Aquatic World award)

Tony Wu / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

Interdependence: Living towers of marine invertebrates punctuate the seabed off Adélie Land, 32 meters below the ice floe of Antarctica.  At the base of an arbuscular sponge extends a starfish more than 30 centimeters in diameter.  The sponge's branches are draped in life, including a giant ribbon worm, and dotted with sea cucumbers (Portfolio award).


Interdependence: Living towers of marine invertebrates punctuate the seabed off Adélie Land, 32 meters below the ice floe of Antarctica. At the base of an arbuscular sponge extends a starfish more than 30 centimeters in diameter. The sponge’s branches are draped in life, including a giant ribbon worm, and dotted with sea cucumbers (Portfolio award).

Laurent Ballesta, Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2022

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